Dating dinosaur fossils

Of course we're hoping that now that we've corrected the material below, that this is solid A work!

dating dinosaur fossils-48

Sedimentary rock (sandstone, siltstone, shale, limestone, etc) is primarily laid down by moving water, layer upon layer, in a process known as hydrologic sorting.

Animals whose fossil remains are found must have been caught in this running water to have been buried and preserved.

However, scientists are consistently finding C-14, as reported in 2011 in the journal PLo S One for an allegedly 80-million year old mosasaur, and as reported elsewhere in natural gas, limestone, fossil wood, coal, oil, graphite, marble, the ten dinosaurs described above, and even in supposedly billion-year-old diamonds.

A secondary assumption by old-earth scientists proposes that the C-14 in diamonds (coal, etc.) must have come from N-14 (or C-13, etc.) and neutron capture.

The remains would be sorted by density just as the rocks were.

If not buried, the carcass would rot or be scavenged.

And consider this from a peer-reviewed paper in a respected scientific journal, "at a constant 10°C (the approximate mean annual air temperature in Britain today) it will take between 0.2 and 0.7 Ma for levels of collagen to fall to 1% of their original concentration in an optimal burial environment." * Getting Graded: An expert on radiocarbon dating, long-time assistant professor at Loma Linda University, Dr. The teacher corrected a couple points and clarified a few others.

Paul Giem himself, graded the information presented below. He gave the original text (available here) a grade of A minus.

In 1838, William Parker Foulke found the first (nearly) complete dinosaur fossil remains in New Jersey, USA.

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