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I hope to see more political thrillers like Double Agent in the future, not necessarily about North-South relations, but about all aspects of the recent history of the Korean peninsula.

There are so many compelling stories yet to be told on the silver screen.

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He hides his true loyalties, resists assimilation into the capitalist and pleasure-seeking South Korean culture.

And yet when Rim meets his courier cum contact Yun-mi (Ko So-young), raised in South Korea as a spy almost from the day of her birth, his absolute faith in the Worker's Party begins to crumble.

It tells the story of Ji-hye, a university student who discovers a secret box filled with old letters while her mother is traveling overseas.

As she explores its contents, she comes to learn of her mother's first love affair, a story which closely parallels her own situation at the university.

Grammy Award-winning gospel artist Tamela Mann will headline the 150th Anniversary Celebration of the California Conference of the Western Episcopal District.( You Can Read It Here ) The sesquicentennial anniversary marks 150 years of AME Zion's spiritual leadership and ministry in the greater California region. She is also known for her role as Cora in Tyler Perry's plays, and numerous films including Sparkle, Diary of a Mad Black Woman, Madea Goes to Jail and Madea's Big Happy Family.

The grand celebration will take place on Saturday, June 9 at Beebe Memorial Cathedral (3900 Telegraph Rd) in Oakland, CA. The Grammy, Dove, Stellar and BET Award winner has also starred in several popular television programs including the TBS sitcom Meet the Browns and Bo…

There is no liberty in South Korea either, dumbass." These bureaucratic scourges know that preservation of the system is what the spy game is all about: neither revolution, nor justice, nor the unification of the "people split asunder" has anything to do with it in the end.

The film explores this theme through its focus on one tough operative caught between two "fatherlands," which merely see him as a pawn in the grand game of chess, expendable and readily replaceable. He withstands the torture and gains trust of the South Korean spooks.

On the other hand, the movie's technical accomplishments are top-notch.

From the title sequence that stunningly and seamlessly integrates Han Suk-kyu into the documentary footage of a North Korean military parade, to the impeccable production design of the drab KCIA offices and the dreadful torture chamber in Namsan, to Michael Staudacher's majestic music score, there is very little from the production end that can be called sloppy or indifferent.

An espionage thriller almost classical in its schemata (A movie that it immediately reminded me of was Martin Ritt's 1965 adaptation of John Le Carre's The Spy Who Came in From the Cold), the movie was somewhat overshadowed by the publicity surrounding the casting of Han Suk-kyu and Ko So-young, both of whom chose this project for a comeback film after long hiatuses.

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