Workplace dating policies

Check the company handbook to find out if there are any policies related to interoffice relationships.Even if there are no explicit policies against it, find out how upper management feels about office romances.

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"It's hard enough today to concentrate with open office spaces, a plethora of technology devices, frantic deadlines, multiple bosses, and so on," says Taylor.

"Add to that two lovers fighting over doing dishes in the next cube and you have one unhappy coworker, who you may catch sauntering to HR." Also, it's entirely unprofessional to complain about your personal relationships at work, whether you're dating a colleague or not. What happens at home or in your personal life (no matter who you're dating) almost always affects your attitude, which affects your work — it's just a fact of life.

You and your new partner need to agree on some ground rules and come up with a plan for how you will keep it professional and stay within written or unwritten rules.

"What will be your plan 'B' if the heat is on from a supervisor, from gossip, or if things go awry? "You may have the burden of overcompensating with professionalism and keeping an artificial distance, which can be an awkward strain," says Taylor.

The office has always been a reliable place to meet a partner.

A 2017 Career Builder survey found that as many as 41% of workers have dated a colleague — and that nearly one-third of those relationships ended in marriage.

Consider, too, what you'll do if things work out: Will one of you leave the company to avoid the relationship interfering with work?

As Lynn Taylor previously told Business Insider, if "love happens to strike at work, don't make a concerted effort to fight it at any cost.

"Save it for your family or friends outside work." Talking about the relationship can be distracting or make colleagues feel uncomfortable, so don't do it.

Again — nobody wants or needs to know about what's happening with your love life.

The Journal spoke to Anna Wood, the founder and CEO of Brains Over Blonde who worked at Google for four years.

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